Recently, I stumbled across an article in the Harvard Business Review about wartime and peacetime CEOs. I found this topic fascinating in how leaders approach times of crisis versus times of relative peace.

What Does a Wartime Leader Look Like?

In the article, Bill Taylor, Taylor epitomizes the Wartime CEO as that of Andy Grove. Grove’s book, Only the Paranoid Survive, epitomizes the philosophy behind the Wartime leader. A wartime leader must maintain focus in order for his or her organization to survive. OKRs or objectives and key results were born out of this idea. 

What Does a Peacetime Leader Look Like?

A peacetime leader is focused on growth and expanding the boundaries of the existing organization. These leaders pride themselves on creating culture, inspiring growth, and creating economic value. Eric Schmidt (former CEO of Google) is an example of a peacetime CEO. 

Maybe a Little of Both

Be careful about labeling yourself a wartime or peacetime leader because many leaders that prefer one label or another will actively create scenarios so that they can practice the type of leadership strategy that most comes naturally to them. 

Wartime leaders will create chaos so that they can become shortsighted and only focus on short-term results. Peacetime leaders can be so focused on building consensus and growth they may unconsciously choose to overlook issues because they what to remain optimistic about their plans.

The best approach is to be open to both ways of leading. A good leader needs to know what kind of challenges their facing and what kind of strategy might be better suited. If peacetime, align key staff to build growth plans. In wartime’s, make sure the right resources are armed and ready to go.

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Showing up for Work: The Spectrum of Authenticity

Working with my feet on the desk

Lately, I’ve been curious about how people find themselves at work. It seems harder to let outside influences go as we jump into our days in a world that sometimes seems anything but normal. Many of us try to “be professional” as we sit at dining room tables that have become our home offices, attending Zoom calls while attempting to mute at the same moments our toddler screams and our dogs bark at the Amazon guy. The usual distractions used to be the smell of someone heating up last night’s fish in the community microwave or the coworker’s personal conversations over the cube wall, but now our distractions are intensely personal and not as easy to drown out.

As we work from home, making a clear distinction between our home and work lives is becoming harder. So the question becomes, “Do we try harder to force the separation or just let our coworkers and clients see a little more about who we are outside the office?” Although uncomfortable, my vote is for the latter. I also don’t think that we have to swing from one extreme to another, based on who we’re interacting with that day we can work within a spectrum of authenticity that is based on trust. 

Low Trust: Higher Walls

If we’re dealing with a client or coworker that we may be lower on the trust scale, we may choose to build some barriers between our home life and the life we project on our Zoom meetings. Some ways that we can create some “space” starts with how we’ve configured our digital meeting space. For example, if you’re working in your bedroom, you may want to consider using the Zoom background feature. This can give you a little more privacy while you’re doing video-conferencing. Also, you may want to invest in a noise-canceling headset.  A headset is a great way to filter external noises at your house, but it’s also a great way to prevent your little ones from overhearing heated business discussions.

Medium Trust: Test the Waters

Perhaps you’ve been working with your coworkers for a few years and you’re willing to test the waters maybe it might be time to let them in a little to your home life. The Covid pandemic has introduced a completely new element to our working lives and it’s natural to feel a little uncomfortable in this new environment. Although Dorie Clark’s article What to Do When You Don’t Feel Comfortable Being Yourself at Work was originally written for those that don’t feel comfortable in their current work environments, I think it can offer some great suggestions for those that are uncomfortable about working from home. Broadcasting our home lives can display some of our deepest vulnerabilities however, exposing these vulnerabilities can also open us up to deeper relationships. The key with those you’re starting to build relationships with is to start small and work from there.

High Trust: It’s Still Not a Face-to-Face Conversation

If you’re on a work call with a colleague or client you’ve been working with for years, still beware of the technology you’re using to communicate. If you are using a technology that is sponsored by your company, it could be automatically recorded. And if it is recorded, are you sure you want that conversation played back to you someday? Based on the relationship (colleague or client) you may choose to introduce your family members while on conference calls (especially if you’re interrupted), but you still want to make sure that each layer you reveal of your personal life is being matched by your colleague or client. 

Working from home presents an interesting social experiment. After years of working with people face-to-face, seeing how they live and interact with their families presents some challenges. Continuing to assess how we show up for work and the version of ourselves we display will continue to evolve. There are no easy answers but continuing to examine who we trust with which information will continue to be a factor in how we now reveal ourselves to those we live and work with.