Let’s face it; change is hard. Many of us have recently dealt with more change than we ever thought possible. In the shift to remote work, many of us have learned that implementing change requires more than just a solid strategy for change management, but on a deeper level, it requires a commitment to learning how to work differently. 

Many of us initially struggled with the transition from face-to-face to remote. However, after we did a little training by reading some articles, watching a few Zoom meeting tutorials, and then practiced what we had learned, we got better. We need to apply the same strategy to our organizations after creating a change. We must solidify the change by continuing to train and reinforce how we’ve learned to work differently after the change. In this article, we’ll discuss three ways to use training and development to reinforce the changes made at your organization.

  1. Use a training sandwich approach. When a change or new process is rolled out, make sure you create a training sandwich. Train your team before, during, and post-implementation. Repetition is key to solidifying change and making it “stick.” Although there are many ways to approach this idea, Procore is a great example of a software company that has given tremendous thought to how important training is to adoption. Procore has learning paths and certification programs for each type of user accessing their platform as well as continuing education content.
  1. A link to a Confluence page or a Sharepoint site is NOT training. Training by definition is “the skill, knowledge, or experience acquired by one that trains.” Other synonyms for training include: drill, exercise, practice. In Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead, Mattis details the preparation required prior to any military campaign. Drills and practice are critical to the success of any mission and Mattis attributes much of the success he experienced on the battlefield to the drills conducting prior to each mission. Successful outcomes directly resulted from extensive practice so that when errors were made on the battlefield, his troops could quickly adapt and overcome. What if we applied this same care and diligence in our training programs after a change was made within our organization? Practicing what we learn is key to adoption.
  1. Communication is a two-way street. After changes are made, many times the communication stops. Implementors of change stop sending written communication and managers stop discussing the new change at meetings. However, how teams communicate change and keep the conversation going, is another key aspect of training. Communication should not be the one-way push of information. A key element of communication is listening to feedback and creating forums for discussion. Don’t underestimate the power of listening to your team. Discussion is a key element of learning and reinforcing new changes. These discussions can also lead to improvements and innovation as well.

Change may not always be easy, it’s important to nurture the change once it’s made. Backing change with a solid training approach is an excellent way to reinforce and increase adoption within an organization.

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What Would Ted Lasso Say?

Every Friday, my husband and I look forward to getting our two-year-old son into bed so that we can watch Ted Lasso. I didn’t think I would be into this show, but after a few of our friends recommended it, we decided to give it a try. My husband is an avid Manchester United fan and is also pretty familiar with the Premier League, so it’s always interesting to have a discussion with him each week about how the episode reminds him of real players and real leadership situations. I have found myself really enjoying the additional context to Ted Lasso, but I’ve also found myself really enjoying Ted’s leadership style and a few of Ted’s more quotable moments. 

1. “Be a Goldfish.” Ted uses this line when he’s talking to one of his players after he makes a mistake. The reason he gives for the Goldfish being so happy is he has the shortest memory. We all mistakes and don’t we all wish we didn’t. I am definitely one of those people that can overanalyze a bit much sometimes when it comes to my decisions and actions, so keeping this phrase in mind makes me chuckle to myself just a bit when I start getting too wrapped up in the past. This humorous motto is a great reminder not to take our mistakes too seriously and to just let them go.

2. “It’s about helping these young fellas be the best versions of themselves on and off the field.” In season one, it’s amazing how much vitriol is slung at Ted from the stands, from the streets, from his team, and secretly from his manager. Despite the insults and negative attitudes, Ted pushes on while optimistically pursuing his dream of making the players versions of themselves. Although he’s a fictional character, I can’t help but imagine what it might be like to be a coach of a sports team and constantly having your decisions second-guessed and criticized in a very public way. Although it seems painful, Ted is never deterred by the public’s review of his performance, he remains focused on his purpose with the team: making them “the best versions of themselves.” 

3. It’s okay if people underestimate you. One of my favorite moments in season one is when the audience finds out that Ted has a hidden talent when it comes to darts. He uses this time to shine to the benefit of his boss. From time to time, I think all of us need to have our egos stroked, but I find it interesting that Ted only uses his talent to shine when it is for the purpose of serving another.

I know I can fall into the trap of taking myself too seriously sometimes and I’m glad that I have a weekly reminder from Ted Lasso that as I pursue some of my biggest goals, I don’t have to lose sight of having a little fun along the way. If you haven’t checked out Ted Lasso, I hope you might watch a few episodes and see if you can glean a few great insights as to how to have a little more fun as you play the game of life. I know I have.