Webinar presentation for SMPS Southeast Regional Conference

Recently, I had the pleasure of presenting “Charting a Course in Change Management” with Courtney Kearney for The Society of Marketing Professional Services Southeast Regional Conference.In the presentation, we outlined Dr. Kotter’s 8-Step Process for Change Management. I had presented this topic with Courtney about 6 months ago at a Zweig Conference in Las Vegas. It’s amazing how much can change in such a short time. During our initial presentation, Covid-19 wasn’t even on the radar. When we were addressing questions from the audience, they focused mainly on how to handle implementing technological changes to accommodate growth in an expanding market. Now, our presentation featured questions from the audience on how to manage changes forced on our business based on a global pandemic. Although change is the only constant, why does it still feel so hard even with the small changes? Why do we resist something that is so natural? Even though I’d like to think of myself as someone who can handle change well, Covid-19 has taught me that I still have so much to learn. If you’re curious to hear more about change management, please check out the presentation that Courtney and I gave on July 10, 2020.

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What Would Ted Lasso Say?

Every Friday, my husband and I look forward to getting our two-year-old son into bed so that we can watch Ted Lasso. I didn’t think I would be into this show, but after a few of our friends recommended it, we decided to give it a try. My husband is an avid Manchester United fan and is also pretty familiar with the Premier League, so it’s always interesting to have a discussion with him each week about how the episode reminds him of real players and real leadership situations. I have found myself really enjoying the additional context to Ted Lasso, but I’ve also found myself really enjoying Ted’s leadership style and a few of Ted’s more quotable moments. 

1. “Be a Goldfish.” Ted uses this line when he’s talking to one of his players after he makes a mistake. The reason he gives for the Goldfish being so happy is he has the shortest memory. We all mistakes and don’t we all wish we didn’t. I am definitely one of those people that can overanalyze a bit much sometimes when it comes to my decisions and actions, so keeping this phrase in mind makes me chuckle to myself just a bit when I start getting too wrapped up in the past. This humorous motto is a great reminder not to take our mistakes too seriously and to just let them go.

2. “It’s about helping these young fellas be the best versions of themselves on and off the field.” In season one, it’s amazing how much vitriol is slung at Ted from the stands, from the streets, from his team, and secretly from his manager. Despite the insults and negative attitudes, Ted pushes on while optimistically pursuing his dream of making the players versions of themselves. Although he’s a fictional character, I can’t help but imagine what it might be like to be a coach of a sports team and constantly having your decisions second-guessed and criticized in a very public way. Although it seems painful, Ted is never deterred by the public’s review of his performance, he remains focused on his purpose with the team: making them “the best versions of themselves.” 

3. It’s okay if people underestimate you. One of my favorite moments in season one is when the audience finds out that Ted has a hidden talent when it comes to darts. He uses this time to shine to the benefit of his boss. From time to time, I think all of us need to have our egos stroked, but I find it interesting that Ted only uses his talent to shine when it is for the purpose of serving another.

I know I can fall into the trap of taking myself too seriously sometimes and I’m glad that I have a weekly reminder from Ted Lasso that as I pursue some of my biggest goals, I don’t have to lose sight of having a little fun along the way. If you haven’t checked out Ted Lasso, I hope you might watch a few episodes and see if you can glean a few great insights as to how to have a little more fun as you play the game of life. I know I have.